• Mega Magosaburō Nagamune [妻鹿孫三郎長宗] at Battle of Tōji [束寺] number 3 (三 in the lower right) - from an untitled warrior series by Okumura Masanobu
Mega Magosaburō Nagamune [妻鹿孫三郎長宗] at Battle of Tōji [束寺] number 3 (三 in the lower right) - from an untitled warrior series by Okumura Masanobu
Mega Magosaburō Nagamune [妻鹿孫三郎長宗] at Battle of Tōji [束寺] number 3 (三 in the lower right) - from an untitled warrior series by Okumura Masanobu
Mega Magosaburō Nagamune [妻鹿孫三郎長宗] at Battle of Tōji [束寺] number 3 (三 in the lower right) - from an untitled warrior series by Okumura Masanobu
Mega Magosaburō Nagamune [妻鹿孫三郎長宗] at Battle of Tōji [束寺] number 3 (三 in the lower right) - from an untitled warrior series by Okumura Masanobu

Okumura Masanobu (奥村政信) (artist late 1680s - early 1760s)

Mega Magosaburō Nagamune [妻鹿孫三郎長宗] at Battle of Tōji [束寺] number 3 (三 in the lower right) - from an untitled warrior series by Okumura Masanobu

Print


ca 1710
13.25 in x 9 in (Overall dimensions) Japanese woodblock print
Honolulu Museum of Art
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - #2 of an untitled warrior series
British Museum - ca. 1851-52 Kuniyoshi triptych of the Battle of Tōji Illustrated in Japanese Warrior Prints 1646-1905 by James King and Yuriko Iwakiri, Hotei Publishing, 2007, page 56. Their text reads: "The warrior Mega Magosaburō Nagamune served Akamatsu Norimura (1277-1350), a general who was a vassal of Emperor Go-Daigo (1287-1338; r. 1318-38). Magosaburō assisted in the fight against the Kamakura shogunate and also aided Ashikaga Takauji (1305-58; r. 1338-58) against the Hōjō regent. Battle of Tō Temple took place in 1333. According to the 'Rokuharazaemon no koto' ('Attack on Rokuhara'), Chapter 9 of the Taiheiki, Magosaburō fought against the Hōjō clan at the gate of Tō temple. His appearance is quite similar to the Niō (Deva King), the guardian of the gate.

This print is the third sheet from a set of twelve given the name Cherry Blossom of Dash and Spirit."

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"The Buddhist world of medieval Japan can only be described as chaotic. It was conventionally portrayed as a conglomerate of different schools (shū 宗), such as Tendai, Shingon and the six Nara schools, but these schools were little more than nebulous networks of competing lineages, concentrated in competing temple complexes. In the case of the Shingon school, the Tōji, Kōya-san, Tōdaiji, Ninnaji and Daigoji temple complexes were the most important."

This is quoted from The Culture of Secrecy in Japanese Religion, essay by Mark Teeuwen, p. 182.

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The hand-colored example in Honolulu - see the link above - is not attributed to any particular artist, but probably should be given to Okumura Masanobu.
warrior prints (musha-e - 武者絵) (genre)